Lesson 52, Man Does Not Live By Bread Alone, But He Might Want To


I have written my thoughts, and appreciation for the potato-doughnut recipe in previous posts on a cooking website known as DiscussCooking.com. Last night, I was in the mood to make some bread. I have several good recipes for white, wheat, and multi-grain breads, all of which give me great results (especially since I now, usually add vital wheat gluten to the flour mixture). But instead of using one of my bread recipes, I decided to use the potato-dounut recipe, with a few tips I learned from paying attention to those who know how to bake bread. For those who don’t know, potato-doughnuts are a yeast-raised doughnut that incorporates mashed potatoes in the pastry dough.  The doughnuts are amazingly tender, and light, and absolutely scrumptious.  I’ve used the dough to make dinner rolls, cinnamon rolls, doughnuts, and scones (yeast raised frybread).  Last night, for the first time, I put the dough into loaf pans and made bread.  And what bread it is.

The resulting bread was possible the best I’ve ever made. It is airy, light, moist, with a great yeasty, mildly sweet flavor that works perfectly with savory and sweet, such as gravies, or fruit jams.

Of course when it came out of the oven, DW (that’s dear wife) and I both had a slice of warm bread with butter. It came out so good that with the first bite, my eyes rolled upward with that overwhelming sensation of something rare and wonderful. This morning, I made a piece of thick toast with it, spread on butter, then strawberry freezer jam. No eye rolls this time, as I knew what to expect. Instead, I ate it slowly, to make every bite tickle my senses as long as possible. For me at least, this was the perfect piece of toast.

Now I’m not bragging, as I certainly didn’t creat the recipe. I’ve just used it in ways unique. It was originally a yeast-raised doughnut recipe. I’ve discovered that it is much more. And so, I give it to you. This recipe will make two loaves, with enough leftover to fry up some scones. Or, you can just make three loaves. I wanted three loaves. DW wanted some scones. I made two loaves with dough left over for a scones breakfast.

Here’s the recipe, so you can enjoy this wonderful bread. I’m thinking that you could make really great English Muffins with it as well.

[B]Potato Bread:[/B]

Ingredients:

1 lb potatoes (about 3 medium russets)
2 1/4 cups whole milk
1/2 cup sugar
2 Large eggs
1 tbs. salt
1/2 cup cooking oil
8 cups all-purpose flour

Microwave, or boil potatoes until cooked through. Peel and mash until lump free. While the spuds a cooking, Heat the milk and sugar to a temperature of 110′ F. Stir in the yeast until dissolved. Let sit until a head of froth develops on top. Beat in the eggs, salt, and cooking oil.

Add the mashed potatoes to the milk mixture and stir until all is creamy. Add the flour. Knead for ten minutes, or until smooth and elastic. Place in a 110′ oven, with a pan of boiling water and let rise until doubled is size (about 20 minutes). Punch the dough down and fill buttered bread pans 2/3rds full of dough. Place the remainder of the dough in a zipper-freezer bag and place in your fridge for tomorrow’s scones.

When the dough as again doubled, remove the pans from the oven and heat the oven to 375′ F. Leave the pan of water in the oven. Place the loaf pans in, on the center shelf position, and bake for 30 minutes. When the crust is golden brown, lightly thump the bread with your knuckles. If it sounds somewhat hollow, it’s done. Remove from the oven, and let cool for ten minutes. Remove the bread from the pans and let cool before bagging them.  And there you have it, one of the best breads you’re gonna eat. Enjoy.

May your warm things be warm, your cold things be cold, and your cheddar be served at room temperature.

“No success outside the home can compensate for failure withing the home.”

From the Kitchen’s of G.W. North